Marx Nutty Mad with a fresh new paint job by Adam Pratt

A while back I stumbled across some of Adam Pratt’s custom painted figures online and was amazed how he was able to transform a cheap gumball machine toy into a one-of-a-kind work of art. After a brief email exchange, I learned that Adam does commissions, so I sent off the vintage Marx Nutty Mad “End Zone” figure that I bought at the DC Big Flea last year, and asked him to have fun with it. The only instruction I gave him was that I was a fan of the Washington Redskins so it would be cool to see their color scheme on the figure.

Here is the original figure, which was a solid dark pink color..

marx nutty mads end zone football player

…and here is the figure after Adam Pratt’s handiwork…

marx nutty mads end zone football player

When I opened the package, I couldn’t believe this was the same figure. The figure actually felt like porcelain when I lifted it out of the box and saw the detailed paintwork. The only indicator that this is an original Nutty Mad is the Marx stamp on the bottom of the base, which is still that dark pink color. I LOVE this goofy figure so much more now!

marx nutty mads end zone football player closeup detail

Check out the detail of the painting–those lips actually look chapped!

marx nutty mads end zone football player closeup detail

This puny Dallas defender can’t bring down the ‘Skins! (If only.)

This figure is going in a prime location on the shelf and I can’t thank Adam enough for his great work. If you like what you see, head over to Adam Pratt’s website for even more and commission a little something for yourself!

Comments

  1. says

    Brian, we can make that happen. Just shoot me an email. =) Imagine the series though, all in color? It would be something else.

    Justin, thanks man! It was a fun paint. I like kits that size, and the sculpting really helped it along.

  2. says

    Great pictures! They really help to show off the amazing work that Adam does. I know when people talk about customized toys the cliche “you’ve got to see it in person” always gets thrown around. However, Adam’s work is simply stunning in person.

    You hit it right on the head Brian when you said you couldn’t believe it was the same figure. It’s the same experience I’ve had with Adam’s work.

  3. says

    I prime the model first after washing it with mild soap.I use an acrylic hobby primer. The model is base coated, then I use washes to create both shade and tint, depending on the need. Then highlights are blocked in.

  4. says

    @kngfu I am not sure what you mean, but I can explain my painting process.

    The toy was washed with warm water and a mild detergent, and then left to air dry. After drying, it was sprayed with a very thin hobby primer, and left to dry under a lamp for about 5 hours.
    I then apply a base coat of paint over the entire model, blocking in each color area, working from the inside out.
    An acrylic wash is then applied to create shadows, after this dries I then use acrylic glaze on some areas to tint the paint (the stubble on his chin for example)
    Then highlights are painted on in progressive steps, usually two or three shades higher than the basecoat in successive coats.
    After that, fine details are picked out, and the entire toy was matte sealed.

    Thanks!

  5. Bonsai Bobby says

    Hey…Just stumbled across this site and wished to express my sincere sense of awe,with the “End Zone” paint job….Wondered what airbrush Adam is using…..

    I’ve personally been using hand brushes and enamels,with some succses and own a number of figures that were professionally hand-brushed using acrylics….but as nice as they are,it’s difficult to match the beauty produced by an air-brush professional….Thanks,Bob

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